Home Online Learning Student Research Showcase Finalists to Present Research on November 12
Student Research Showcase Finalists to Present Research on November 12

Student Research Showcase Finalists to Present Research on November 12

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By Dr. Jose A. Rodriguez, Ed.D.
Director of Doctoral and Faculty Research and Experiential Learning, American Public University System

Start a degree program at American Public University.

APUS Graduate Studies & Research is pleased to announce the 2019 Student Research Showcase finalists. This competition, part of the Three-Minute Thesis contest, is designed to help graduate students condense their research into a brief, engaging presentation for a non-specialist audience.

The live presentations from the finalists will take place via Adobe Connect on November 12, 2019 from 12 to 1 p.m. ET.

On that day, cash prizes will be awarded to the First Place winner and the Runner-Up winner.

On November 14, each presentation recording will be displayed on the internet for public voting during a two-week period. The People’s Choice winner will be announced the week of December 2, 2019.

Student Research Showcase Presentations Offer Challenge to Students’ Abilities

Imagine hearing an 80,000-word thesis explained in less than 180 seconds; that is the basis of the competition. The objective is for graduate students to create and promote a presentation of their capstone project/Portfolium. It is a great opportunity for students to demonstrate their research skills, promote themselves and fine-tune their public speaking abilities.

The three finalists this year are Denise McNeff, Chyanne Rosenbaum and Shelby Jackson-Register.

Presenter: Denise McNeff, M.A. in History

Title: What Do Civil War Paintings Represent? A Minnesota Perspective

Denise says, “My research has focused upon the national implications of Minnesota’s acceptance as a state in 1858 and its involvement in the Civil War. Antebellum Minnesota was extremely polarized politically, with deep animosity and violence, which was common throughout the United States during that period. The painting ‘Battle of Nashville’ by Howard Pyle memorialized Minnesota’s ability to set aside differences and unite, contrasted by the failure of the Union to do the same.”

Presenter: Chyanne Rosenbaum, M.S. in Environmental Policy & Management

Title: Essential Oils and Fish Pathogens

Chyanne says of her presentation, “Bacterial fish pathogens have been increasingly experiencing antibiotic resistance over the past few years. Coincidentally, essential oils have also gained some attention with many ‘cure-all’ testimonials. This study is an amalgamation of expanding both essential oil and bacterial fish pathogen research. While essential oils may not be the cure-all that hipsters stand behind, further research is encouraged for this topic in aquaculture.”

Presenter: Shelby Jackson-Register, Alumni, M.S. in Environmental Policy and Management

Title: Red Wolf (Canis rufus) and Coyote (Canis latrans) Population Management: One without the Other?

Shelby says, “My Three-Minute Thesis presentation is in regard to the population management challenges of the red wolf and coyote in North Carolina. I examine the history of the red wolf and introduction of the coyote into North Carolina, and I use several methods to determine the viability of the red wolf in the wild without effectively managing the coyote.”

The Three-Minute Thesis competition began at Australia’s University of Queensland in 2008. It is a great way for students to let others know about their research projects and practice their communication skills.

About the Author

Dr. Jose A. Rodriguez joined American Public University System (APUS) in 2013 as program director of Educational Leadership. In 2016, Dr. Rodriguez was Acting Dean of the School of Education. In 2017, Dr. Rodriguez joined the School of Graduate Studies at APUS as the Director of Doctoral and Faculty Research. 

Dr. Rodriguez brings over 20 years of teaching and leadership experience in both K-12 and higher education. Dr. Rodriguez spent 15 years teaching in secondary schools and community colleges in both Texas and Washington State before spending 8 years in leadership roles as department chair, curriculum/technology district developer, and K-12 school administrator. Later, Dr. Rodriguez received his Ed.D. and transitioned to higher education in 2009. Prior to his current tenure at APUS, Dr. Rodriguez spent three years as program director at Western Governors University, where he was in charge of various K-12 degree programs in the School of Education. While at Western Governors University, Dr. Rodriguez also led in the development of a new M.A. degree in curriculum and instruction.

Dr. Rodriguez holds his Ed.D. in educational leadership and policy studies from the University of Washington in Seattle, WA; his M.A. in political science/sociology from Texas State University in San Marcos, TX; and a B.A. in political science/history from the University of Texas-RGV in Edinburg, TX.

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